Municipalities

Arrowsic

Arrowsic is governed by a selectmen-town meeting system.

Our Town Office
340 Arrowsic Road
Arrowsic, ME 04530.

Telephone: 443- 4609.

The clerk and tax collector are available
at the Town Office at the following times:

Wednesday, 3-5:30 PM
Friday, 8:30-11:00 AM
Visit the Arrowsic website:
http://arrowsic.org/town.html

Arrowsic
Bath
Bowdoin
Bowdoinham
Georgetown
Phippsburg
Richmond
Topsham
West Bath
Woolwich

Downtown-Bath-Evening1.jpg

Bath Bridge Sunset

Bath – Governmental History

In 1738 Georgetown, which included Arrowsic and Long Reach (Bath), was established. On February 17, 1781, the City of Bath was granted a Charter from the General Court of Massachusetts. The Town of Bath, with 3 Selectmen and a Town Meeting, was formed. In 1847 the town experienced rapid growth driven by the shipbuilding industry and the region’s central rail location. Bath was granted a Charter from the State of Maine and became a city.

Maine has 22 communities that are classified as cities. The City of Bath operates under the City Charter required by all cities. This Charter is the written, basic body of laws by which a city will govern itself, similar to a Constitution. Municipal laws are particular laws passed within the framework of the Charter and consistent with State law, to meet certain situations or concerns within the community. In comparison, towns in Maine are not required to have Charters and are governed under Maine Statute with some Home Rule provisions.

The City of Bath's current governmental style is a Council-Manager plan. The Bath City Council, with its nine members, is the legislative body and, as such, is responsible for all policy development. The administrative arm of the City is headed by a City Manager.

For questions and inquiries about the Bath Municipal Government, please see Department pages on the Bath Government section of this website, or call the City Manager's office at 443-8330, weekdays between 8:30 and 4:30.

City Manager's Office
Bath City Hall, 55 Front Street, Bath, Maine 04530
Phone: (207) 443-8330 Fax: (207) 443-8337
Visit the City of Bath website: http://cityofbath.com/

Bowdoin

It is difficult to place ownership for the area now called Bowdoin during the 17th and 18th centuries. In 1620 King James I granted to the Council of Plymouth "All land from 40 degrees North latitude to 48 degrees North latitude, and from sea to sea".

We know that in 1779 James Bowdoin had legal claim to the area of West Bowdoinham Plantation and was granting deeds on land he claimed to be two miles in width and fronting on the Cathance River and Merrymeeting Bay and extending to the Androscoggin River. Some of the early Bowdoin settlers held Indian deeds. There is also a record of James Bowdoin finding squatters in North Bowdoinas he had a horse path cut through his claimed territory in 1750, and family genealogies claim their forefathers to have been in Bowdoin by that time.

In 1788, when the area became incorporated as the town of Bowdoin, it covered nearly 90 square miles and encompassed present day Lisbon and Webster. After incorporation, Bowdoin's town records show a constant move toward civilization. In 1791, the Town voted 40 pounds to maintain three school districts. In 1798 the first meeting house was used for church services and town meetings, and by 1808 town meetings were being held in the "Old meeting House"--an indication of the North Church having been built in 1805.

In 1797 James Rogers and Ebenezer Temple of Bowdoin paid the Selectmen of Bowdoinham $2,000.00 for the privilege of building a road from Bowdoinham's Cathance landing to the Bowdoin line. This road gave Bowdoin residents access to the Kennebec River and hence to the world, opening up possibilities for trade and travel.

With 88 votes for division and 30 opposed, it was voted in 1798 to "incorporate westerly part of town of Bowdoin, in the Countyof Lincoln, into a separate town by the name of Thompsonborough". On June 22, 1799, this move was approved by the Legislature of Massachusetts, and in 1840 this area of Lisbonwas again divided and Webster was formed.

During the years of 1836-37 the West Bowdoin Brick Meeting House was built by Nathaniel and Albert Purinton. In 1837 a Town House was built on the hill of the Widow Jane Smith, with the low bid of $590.00 going to Mr. Lincoln Maloon. Between 1836 and 1837 the South Meeting House was built on land once owned by Elder James Potter and overlooking his grave across the road in the SouthCemetery.

In 1837, despite the growth of churches, the town voted on the method of supporting the poor. It was voted that the poor be set at auction separately (mothers and children not necessarily kept together) and the town agreed to pay the doctor bills and funeral charges. Whoever bid off one or more of these poor was obligated to return the person the next year with clothes in a condition comparable to when they had assumed care. They were to receive pay for the amount bid at auction. For many years town meetings included the setting up and auctioning off of these unfortunates to the lowest bidder.

Also in 1837, John Ridley was sworn in as Pound keeper for the ensuing year. Three people were licensed as Innkeepers to retail spirituous liquors, and four gentlemen were licensed to maintain retail stores, presumably with spirituous liquors as a sideline. Small wonder that the 1838 town meeting voted that all ardent spirits be removed from the town house -- forcefully, if need by, by Johnson Jacques, Esq.

The Civil War had a powerful impact on Bowdoin. One hundred and twenty-eight of its young men marched off to fight and many lost their lives on Southern soil. The strong Baptist leanings of the people fostered a desire to eradicate slavery. Since the 1840's the Baptist clergy had been strongly abolitionist and after years of sermons on the evils of slavery the call to arms found the young men of Bowdoin eager to answer. These were hard and heart-breaking years for all, and many Bowdoin cemeteries contain stones inscribed with the service records of those who died during this war.

bowdoin sign

Bowdoin has suffered fluctuations in growth. A population peak must have been reached in 1850 with 1,861 residents. The 1850 census shows large families, usually with a hired man and a hired woman, and the wage earners listed as farmers or laborers. These people were content with the simple life. Along the old country roads and in the wilds of Haig Mountain you still see the abandoned cellar holes, the lilac bushes, and the apple trees row on row. Then came the Civil War, World War I, and World War II. Life looked easier, richer, and more exciting in the towns and cities with their factories and job opportunities. As the famous World War I song said,"How Are You Going to Keep Them Down on the Farm After They've Seen Paree?". By 1870 the population had dropped to 1,345; in 1880 to 1,361; in 1903 to 940; with an all-time low in 1940 of only 466 Bowdoin residents. Then came cars, phones, electricity and better schools, plus the lure of cheaper property values and lower taxes. The country living, so scorned for fifty years, again became enticing. Bowdoin's population rose again, from 638 in 1950 and 668 in 1960 to 884 in 1970. The biggest increase came between 1970 and 1980 when the population rose to 1,629. The 1990 U. S. Census listed Bowdoin's population at 2,207. Town of Bowdoin 23 Cornish Drive Bowdoin, Maine 04287-0035 Phone: 207-353-6949 Fax: 207-353-9126 Visit the website for the town of Bowdoin at http://www.bowdoinme.com/

Bowdoinham Fire Dept

 

 

  

 

 

Bowdoinham

Website: http://www.bowdoinham.com/

Six Cathance Neck men were cutting hay on the bay shore one hot, August day in 1775, when English seamen from a marauding British warship entered Merrymeeting Bay, spotted the helpless and outnumbered farmers and took them captive.

The six: Robert Fulton, John and William Patten, Thomas Howard, Joseph Berry and David Fuller, were hauled to England as enemies of the Crown. Fulton and William Patten died in England in prison, and were probably Bowdoinham's first victims of the American Revolution. The other four men managed to survive their prison ordeal, and returned to Bowdoinham after the war.

But our town was committed to the revolution even before that kidnapping on Merrymeeting.

It was May, 1775, when voters argued through a special town meeting at their new town-house on the west bank of the Abagadassett River in East Bowdoinham. At that meeting, townsmen voted to elect a committee of correspondence, and voted to purchase and store a supply of gunpowder for the town's defense.

Elihu Getchell, John Patten and George Thomas were named to the committee of correspondence; and Getchell, whose home commanded a sweeping view of the Kennebec and Swan Island, was appointed custodian of the powder.

But we find in early records that not every citizen favored the revolution and, sometime between the May meeting and June 21, 1775, someone set the town's meeting house on fire. It burned flat. Local patriots always claimed that loyalists to the king torched the building, and no one would ever prove them to be wrong.

That first meeting house was started in 1765, high above the Abagadassett River on a bluff perhaps a half mile beyond the old Dunlap Farm. Adams says that Massachusetts Governor Shirley gave the glass for the windows of the meeting house, and that in 1775 at the time of its destruction, the building was one of several town halls in the region.

On Jan. 9, 1775, Bowdoinham town clerk Abraham Preble issued the following warrant: "All the inhabitants of this town liable to bear arms in defense of their country against an enemy [are] to assemble . . . and to consider the recent resolves of congress . . ."

At that meeting, townsmen voted to abide by the resolves of congress, and then voted to elect the following as officers of the town's militia: Abraham Preble, captain; Robert Patten, lieutenant; George Thomas, ensign, and Zacheus Beals, clerk.

A militia meeting was conducted Jan. 23, 1775, to vote on war measures and captain Abraham Preble issued the following charge: "Gentlemen, all of you fit to bear arms are desired to appear . . . to choose the rest of our militia officers and to have something of a training." All of this, it is important to point out, took place months before hostilities opened at that "rude bridge" in Concord.

In May of 1776, townsmen voted to raise 10 pounds to buy more ammunition, and in February, 1778, the town voted "to pay compensation to those persons that went into the continental army . . . ," and $400 was appropriated for that purpose.

Adams' History of Bowdoinham lists two dozen revolutionary war veterans who "lived in and served from Bowdoinham." He suggests that many others may have served who are now forgotten, because "our people were thoroughly aroused and full of enthusiasm, and did all in their power to assist in the overthrow of the English government in this country. "

Town of Bowdoinham, 13 School Street, Bowdoinham, Maine, 04008.
Hours: Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri 8:30-4, and Wed 9-6

Georgetown Maine

Georgetown

Many scenes and dramas have passed within the purview of Georgetown Island, situated at the mouth of the Kennebec River. In pre-history, Native Americans of the Abenaki Confederacy were the first identifiable tribes to use the island, coming down from Norridgewock and the Penobscot region to gourmandize on oysters, fish and clams, and to hunt in winter for ducks and beaver... It is established that Viking ships visited the shores in the 10th century, perhaps landing, and it may be surmised that the Phoenicians could have appeared even a thousand years earlier. Word of the teeming fishing grounds passed from one culture to another and, before the days of Columbus, French, English, Italian, and Portuguese ships made forays into the area... As far as is known, there were no permanent European communities in the “New World” until the Spaniards founded St. Augustine in Florida in 1565. This was followed by the settlement of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607, coincidentally the same year as the Popham Colony was established in Phippsburg at the mouth of the Kennebec... Town Office: 50 Bay Point Road, Georgetown, ME 04548 Phone:207-371-2820 Fax:207-371-2331 Online at Many scenes and dramas have passed within the purview of Georgetown Island, situated at the mouth of the Kennebec River. In pre-history, Native Americans of the Abenaki Confederacy were the first identifiable tribes to use the island, coming down from Norridgewock and the Penobscot region to gourmandize on oysters, fish and clams, and to hunt in winter for ducks and beaver... It is established that Viking ships visited the shores in the 10th century, perhaps landing, and it may be surmised that the Phoenicians could have appeared even a thousand years earlier. Word of the teeming fishing grounds passed from one culture to another and, before the days of Columbus, French, English, Italian, and Portuguese ships made forays into the area... As far as is known, there were no permanent European communities in the “New World” until the Spaniards founded St. Augustine in Florida in 1565. This was followed by the settlement of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607, coincidentally the same year as the Popham Colony was established in Phippsburg at the mouth of the Kennebec... Town Office: 50 Bay Point Road, Georgetown, ME 04548 Phone:207-371-2820 Fax:207-371-2331 Visit online at http://www.GeorgetownME.com

Phippsburg

Phippsburg is a town in Sagadahoc County, Maine, United States, on the west side of the mouth of the Kennebec River. The population was 2,106 at the 2000 census. It is within the Portland–South Portland–Biddeford, Maine Metropolitan Statistical Area. A popular tourist area, Phippsburg is home to Bates-Morse Mountain Conservation Area, Fort Popham State Historic Site, it is also home to the Fort Baldwin which over looks Fort Popham, and Popham Beach State Park. The town includes part of Winnegance.

Mail: 1042 Main Road, Phippsburg, Maine 04562
Phone: 389-2653 or 389-1088 Fax: 207-389-1522
Website: http://www.phippsburg.com/

Town Administrator and Tax Collector/Treasurer - 389-2653
Monday through Friday - 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Assessing Agent - 389-2653
Tuesday and Wednesday - 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. or by appointment

Code Enforcement Officer - 389-2653
Monday through Friday - 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Transfer Station - 389-1402
September 15th to April 30th - Wed & Sat 8-4
May 1st to June 14th - Mon 10-6, Wed & Sat 8-4
June 15th to September 14th - Mon 10-6, Wed & Fri & Sat 8

Phippsburg-Beach

Richmond,_Maine_from_Swan_Island

Richmond

The tract of land which comprises Richmond and Gardiner was purchased in 1649 from the Abenaki Indians by Christopher Lawson. In 1719, Fort Richmond was built by Massachusetts on the western bank of the Kennebec River at what is today Richmond Village. Named for Ludovic Stewart, 1st Duke of Richmond, the fort included a blockhouse, trading post, chapel, officer's and soldiers' quarters, all surrounded by a palisade.

In 1722, Fort Richmond was attacked in a 3 hour siege by warriors from Norridgewock. Houses were burned and cattle slain, but the fort held. Brunswick and other settlements near the mouth of the Kennebec were destroyed. The defense was enlarged in 1723 during Dummer's War. On August 19, 1724, a militia of 208 soldiers departed Fort Richmond under comand of captians Jeremiah Moulton and Johnson Harmon, traveled up the Kennebec in 17 whaleboats, and sacked Norridgewock. Fort Richmond would be rebuilt in 1740, attacked by another tribe in 1750, then dismantled in 1755 when forts Shirley (also called Franfort), Western and Halifax were built upriver.

Settled in 1725, the community was part of Bowdoinham when it was incorporated in 1762 by the Massachusetts General Court. In 1790, Revolutionary War veteran John Plummer was awarded a land grant on Plummer Road, where his son buildt the surviving house about 1810. But President Thomas Jefferson's Embargo of 1807 crippled the port's economy, bankrupted merchants and created a recession which lingered through the War of 1812.

The town was set off and incorporated on February 10, 1823, taking its name from the old fort. Farms produced hay and potatoes. With the arrival of steamboats in teh 1830s, Richmond boomed as a shipbuilding and trade center. A brass foundry was established. The community also produced shoes, sials and wood products. Its peak years were between 1835 and 1857, endowing the town with a wealth of fine Greek Revival architecture, which today makes the old riverport popular with tourists.

Town of Richmond, Maine, 26 Gardiner Street, Richmond, ME 04357
Phone: 207-737-4305 Fax: 207-737-4306 Website: http://www.richmondmaine.com/

Topsham

Like many Mainecoastal communities, Topsham is defined by the woods and waters that surround it. Topsham borders MerrymeetingBay, one of the Northeast's natural wonders. The town encompasses nearly 44 square miles and is a suburban residential community with a strong and growing business base. Historic neighborhoods and houses can be found in many areas around town. Drive a mile or so and you will find yourself surrounded by lush green fields, open farmland, the beautiful views of the Bay and many more spectacular views. Most importantly, what you will find is home. Topsham's progressive school system, low crime rate, several defined historical neighborhoods and beautiful tree lined streets make it the ideal place to raise a family.

Town Office:

100 Main Street, Topsham, ME 04086
Phone: 207-725-5821
Fax:     207-725-1731

West Bath

West Bath is located on the Maine coast between Brunswick and Bath, approximately 35 miles north of Portland on Route 1. Crossing the New Meadows River, West Bath is the gateway to Sagadahoc County. All areas of town can be reached from the New Meadows Road exits from northbound or southbound Route 1. We invite you to search through our web site and read more about us in our Profile.

Town Office Hours
Monday-Friday 8:30am to 4:00pm
(Front Counter is open Mondays 8:30am - 5:30pm)

Town of West Bath
219 Foster's Point Road, West Bath, ME 04530
Phone: 207-443-4342 Fax - 207-443-3256
Website: http://westbath.govoffice.com/

Woolwich

Woolwich a Maine town on the East side of the Kennebec River. First settled in 1638 by Edward Bateman and John Brown. In 1639, Brown purchased the land from Robin Hood, Chief of the Indians at Nequassett. In 1646, Edward Bateman bought the land. The town was incorporated 20 October 1759.

Approximately twelve miles from the Atlantic Ocean, the town is bordered by waterways. On the South and east are the Sasanoa and Sheepscot Rivers and Montsweag Bay.Merrymeeting Bay, the "Meeting of the Waters," on the northwest is the confluence of five rivers, the Kennebec, Androscoggin, Abagadasset, Cathance, and Muddy -- flowing in from the North and West. Together they continue on as one waterway to the sea.In olden days this section was known as the Sagadahoc River. Woolwich received its name from Woolwich, England -- situated in a like manner on a large navigable river. —

Today, Woolwich has a population of approximately 2,911.It is governed by a five member Board of Selectmen and has a town meeting form of government and the home of Woolwich Central School.

 

Woolwich Town House

woolwich maine

Tax Collector's Office, Vehicle Registrations, Excise Tax, Property Tax
Monday 9:00 - 5:00 PM * If Monday is a holiday (see below)
Wednesday 9:00 - 6:00

Following a Monday holiday:
Tax Collector and Town Clerk's Office will be open on Tuesday 8:00 -1:00

Town Hall and Fire Station: 13 Nequasset Road, Woolwich, Maine 04579

Town Administrator: 207-442-7094 and Tax Collector: 207-442-8723

Visit the Website: http://www.woolwich.us